Hyperloop One's Brogan BamBrogan on the future of underwater transport

Hyperloop transportation systems from competing companies have made tremendous strides in the past year, with sled tests, test tracks and public demonstrations planned or completed at several sites around the U.S.

Based in Los Angeles, Hyperloop One (formerly Hyperloop Technologies) is one of the frontrunners in this experimental magnetic propulsion transport system race, with its first successful tests accomplished last month in the desert outside Las Vegas. For now, plans are to complete a straight-line, above-ground tube network to shoot levitating capsules in a near-vacuum environment along their pathways, but questions have arisen in the scientific community and public sector as to whether a hyperloop track could be built to travel underwater.  Hyperloop One's chief technology officer, Brogan BamBrogan, is confident it could easily become a reality ... at a cost, of course.  

He chatted on PRI's Science Friday and discussed his firm's plans and promises for the future and the evolving science behind projecting pods beneath the waves.

“We think we can deliver things people don’t even know they want yet, and that’s going to manifest itself in a lot of ways. So I think we will see some above-grade systems, we’re definitely going to see tunneled systems, and we also want to see some underwater systems. We could build a Hyperloop today; it would just be very expensive.”

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Whether or not you think Elon Musk's visionary tube-based transport system is just an expensive pipe dream or the savior of America's high-speed transportation problems is open for debate, but its presence is inevitably on the horizon. The non-contact propulsion and levitation system will allow for hyperloop to attain high speeds, ultra-low turbulence and low-cost maintanance under a strict safety protocol that Hyperloop One is attempting to achieve when its first manned test gets underway at the end of this year.

Listen to BamBrogan's entire interview below and tell us if you'd take a trip on an underwater hyperloop train.

 

(Via The Mary Sue)

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