Sally Field kicks her Aunt May and The Amazing Spider-Man to the curb

I'm always slightly irked when actors start talking serious smack about roles they hated or films they appeared in that performed poorly, so it's with a bemused smirk that I serve up Sally Field's truculent trouncing of her poor Aunt May in Marc Webb's The Amazing Spider-Man.  The Academy Award-winning actress has recently gone on the record to criticize the lack of depth to her comic-book character in Sony's webslinger reboot from 2012, which barely made back its $230 million budget domestically.


Here's a sample of her trash-talking while a guest on the Howard Stern Show this week:

"It’s really hard to find a three-dimensional character in it. You work it as much as you can, but you can't put ten pounds of s*** in a five-pound bag."

OUCH!  Field, who I completely respect as a professional, has had ample opportunity to voice her opinion on the matter in the movie's development process and beyond, but where were any of these grievances when her agent first brought her the screenplay and while she read it while sunning in the Riviera?  Where were her doubts as she did roundtable read-throughs, as she rehearsed the scenes with the director, after seeing some of her daily rushes, in the rough cut of the movie or in private discussions with the producers, director and/or writers?

Not every role is a multi-faceted exploration of the human psyche, especially in an old-fashioned comic-book movie.  Her part in the film is an essential one, acting as an emotional touchstone, catalyst for action and sympathetic family member for Andrew Garfield's Peter Parker, and I believe she did an adequate job.  I'm sure she got paid more than SAG minimum and it wasn't terribly difficult labor.  Field knew exactly what she was getting into signing on to a comic-book project and got to work with her good friend, producer Laura Ziskin, who was ill at the time and passed away before the film was released.  And let's not forget that, technically, The Amazing Spider-Man was Field's biggest hit of her 50-year career!

Listen to Field's complete explanation of her displeasure with the lovable Aunt May and tell us if you think she's being a bit too harsh.


(Via Geek Tyrant)

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