Batman v Superman's Zack Snyder on the advantages of having a TV/movie DC multiverse

Instead of creating a massive, connected world ala the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Warner Bros. and DC have opted for a multiverse approach to its big- and small-screen projects. So, why is that the best option, according to Zack Snyder?

 The Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice director chatted with the Hall of Justice Podcast about the topic, and had some interesting thoughts on the creative approach. Marvel has tied everything together under the MCU banner, from The Avengers all the way down to Jessica Jones, living in the same version of NYC. 

DC took a very different route. For those keeping count, the DC universe extends to everywhere from Supergirl to Flash/Arrow/Legends, Gotham and the Man of Steel-verse (not to mention the New 52-inspired animated universe). Snyder said he has “100 percent respect and love for what they're doing on TV” and believes the multiverse approach allows you to tell more stories in more interesting ways.

Here’s an excerpt from his comments:

“These characters are bigger than any of the actors playing them. It's almost an American tradition now … As opposed to trying to shoehorn all these storylines into a single universe, we let the characters exist in a multi-universe, and it's a lot more fun, and a lot more value for the audience … [Fans] get to see their favorite, most beloved characters on different adventures at the same time in different universes. It makes it a lot more fun, we get to go in different directions at the same time. I’m like a kid in a candy store with this incredible opportunity. It's really fun. It couldn't be any better.”

Both approaches have their own pros and cons, and there really is no “right” or “wrong” answer here. Yes, Arrow and Flash have almost certainly benefited from their relative creative freedom in ways that Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. could never dream of doing. (We’ve dug into that topic at length before, it’s worth noting.) But S.H.I.E.L.D. is telling stories that will reverberate on the big screen, which is extremely awesome in its own way.

What do you think? Is Snyder right in his assessment?

(Via Comic Book, Hall of Justice Podcast)

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