Former ISS astronaut Chris Hadfield releasing first album recorded in space

Astronaut Chris Hadfield was looking for a way to differentiate from all the other tunes on the market, and it turns out recording his new album primarily in space is a pretty good way to generate some buzz.

Hadfield, a retired Canadian astronaut who commanded the International Space Station (ISS) in 2013, spent a good chunk of his downtime up there recording tunes for his new folk album Space Sessions: Songs From a Tin Can. The former space man said he recorded most of the tunes in his tiny sleep pod, as it was the only place quiet enough not to be drowned out by the noise of the equipment on the station. Many of the songs were inspired by his experiences as an astronaut, with some actually written on the ISS.

As for what sets this album apart, aside from the obvious kitsch? Hadfield said he soon came to realize that everything from playing guitar to singing is greatly affected by weightlessness. Check out an excerpt from his interview with Collect Space:

"Trying to play guitar without gravity, it doesn't seem hard, right? So what? The guitar is just floating, hovering — it should be easier than on Earth, you'd think, because you don't have to hold the guitar up. Well, if suddenly you're weightless...the guitar is not going to sit on your knee, so you need to find some other way to hold [it] still. Otherwise, every movement of your left hand and the guitar takes off!

Gravity drains all of the fluids out of your head, naturally. Gravity squeezes it down. Your sinuses are draining and everything flows down your throat, and your blood is pulled out of your head," he explained. "When you get to orbit, there is nothing to drain your head, except the beating of your heart. So your sinuses fill up and your tongue swells up and the spit stays in your mouth, it won't go down your throat. You end up with a new normal. It is a space voice, not an Earth voice."

Check out the first single, “Feet Up,” below, and let us know what you think:

The album is set to hit shelves Oct. 9.

(Via Collect Space)

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