Intriguing new info for that Lucifer TV series emerges

Well, that didn’t take too long. According to Deadline, Fox and Warner Bros. TV have finally settled on Sleepy Hollow co-creator Len Wiseman (all those Underworld flicks, and Kate Beckinsale’s lucky hubby) to helm the Lucifer TV pilot for Fox and executive-produce alongside creator Tom Kapinos, Jerry Bruckheimer and Jonathan Littman. Kristie Anne Reed also co-executive-produces. The move is done as part of a deal, which sees WBTV-based Jerry Bruckheimer Television and Wiseman (who's already working for Fox) joining the eagerly anticipated project.

The Lucifer TV series is based on characters created back in 1989 by Neil Gaiman for DC/Vertigo imprint. After being a supporting player in Sandman, Satan got his own mini-series before finally going solo all the way with 75 glorious issues from writer Mike Carey. It follows big bad boy Lucifer, who — bored to death and being quite the unhappy camper about being the Lord of Hell — resigns his heavy crown and abandons his kingdom to head to that cray-cray (in a good way) city, L.A., and opens a bar called Lux. There, the nigh-omnipotent fallen angel gets his fun on by helping the LAPD punish criminals. Wait, what? Helping the LAPD? Punishing criminals?

Yep! THAT's the interesting bit of news, because the logline has the Lucifer TV series becoming something more along the lines of a police procedural. When the project was originally bought by Fox as a pilot back in the fall (September, to be precise), there was no police work involved; it was basically about Lucifer coming to L.A. and, as we said, opening an exclusive piano bar called Lux. Sure, there was not much info about the upcoming series when we first learned about it, but frankly there are already a whole bunch of police procedurals out there, and we don't know what to think about Lucifer becoming yet another one, albeit one with supernatural elements. Anywho, shades of Angel, maybe?

What do you think? Are you happy to see Len Wiseman helm the Lucifer pilot? What do you think about the comic-book-based TV series becoming more of a police procedural rather than the noirish fantasy we originally thought we were getting?

(via Deadline)

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