Check out which genre films were just selected for the National Film Registry

The Library of Congress just added another 25 films to its registry, and a few genre classics are on the list.

Each year, the National Film Registry selects a new crop of films to be preserved in the Library of Congress. The terms of selection for the registry are simple: The film must be at least 10 years old and must be deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically" significant. That opens the selection process up to almost any important film, ranging from forgotten silent movie landmarks to modern classics and even shorts. This year marks the 25th anniversary of National Film Registry selection, and over the years plenty of important sci-fi, fantasy and horror films have made their way into the archive, including Star WarsThe MatrixThe War of the Worlds (1953), Planet of the ApesDracula and Night of the Living Dead. Now more genre films are making their way into the Registry.

The Registry announced its list of 2014 inductees this week, which includes comedy classics like The Big Lebowski and western classics like Rio Bravo, but horror and fantasy are also represented. Rosemary's Baby, the 1968 psychological horror film from writer and director Roman Polanski, will enter the registry this year, as will the 1953 horror film House of Wax, starring genre legend Vincent Price. On the fantasy side of things, the registry selected Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, the 1971 adaptation of Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, starring Gene Wilder as the mad candymaker Willy Wonka. Also of genre note is the 1986 short film Luxo Jr., an early computer-animated effort from Pixar Animation Studios in which two lamps come to life and play with a rubber ball. The lamp has since become a key component of Pixar's logo. 

To view the full list of 2014 National Film Registry inductees, which also includes Saving Private Ryan and Ferris Bueller's Day Off, head HERE. To see a list of every film in the registry to date, head HERE.

(via The Playlist)

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