Scientists claim aliens put secret genetic code in human DNA

Scientists have been peeling away layers for decades now, but the human genome still remains one of the biggest mysteries out there. Turns out that could be because aliens hid a secret signal in there.

Two researchers from Kazakhstan have hypothesized that billions of years ago, aliens may have left a “manufacturer’s stamp” on our DNA as a calling card. Hey, we put logos on T-shirts and cars, so who’s to say the aliens didn’t toss their trademark on our genetic code?

Scientists Vladimir I. shCherbak of al-Farabi Kazakh of the National University of Kazakhstan and Maxim A. Makukov of the Fesenkov Astrophysical Institute theorize that there is an “intelligent signal” embedded in our DNA that cannot be explained by evolution. They’ve coined the phrase “biological SETI” to explain the phenomenon.

Even cooler? If we're ever able to figure it out, they believe this hidden code could be the key to finally making contact.

Writing in the scientific journal Icarus, the researchers claim their conclusions could be proof the code was created billions of years ago, outside of our solar system.

Here’s an excerpt, via Discovery:

“Once fixed, the code might stay unchanged over cosmological timescales; in fact, it is the most durable construct known. Therefore it represents an exceptionally reliable storage for an intelligent signature. Once the genome is appropriately rewritten the new code with a signature will stay frozen in the cell and its progeny, which might then be delivered through space and time.”

“Simple arrangements of the code reveal an ensemble of arithmetical and ideographical patterns of symbolic language ... Accurate and systematic, these underlying patterns appear as a product of precision logic and nontrivial computing.”

Basically, their conclusion is this: Human DNA is proving to be so complex, there’s no way it happened naturally through evolution. So it must have been some higher-level being (aliens, God, etc.) that got the ball rolling.

What do you think?

(Via Discovery)