Repo Man director needs your help adapting classic Harry Harrison novel

If you're a sci-fi nut looking for your next Kickstarter obsession, director Alex Cox has something to show you.

Cox, best known for flicks like Repo ManSid & Nancy and Straight to Hell, first optioned legendary sci-fi author Harry Harrison's 1965 novel Bill, the Galactic Hero back in the '80s, but never could get financing for it. The two stayed friends, though, and before Harrison's death last year, they once again discussed bringing Bill to the big screen.

"Last year, we came up with a plan to shoot Bill as a feature here at the University of Colorado in Boulder ... where I teach production and screenwriting," Cox said.

Bill is a satire originally written in response to Robert Heinlein's Starship Troopers. The title character is a farmboy who is unwittingly recruited into an intergalactic war between humans and a reptilian race known as "Chingers." But Bill doesn't get all the glory of combat. Instead, he's assigned to be a "fuse tender," working in the bowels of a starship to replace fuses. Cox has held on to his dream of making the project for three decades, and now, with the help of his film students and a little money from the fans, he's hoping to finally get it made via Kickstarter.

To keep the budget low, most of the work on the film will be done by Harrison's film students (with, Cox notes, supervision from industry professionals), and almost everything will be shot using existing locations in and around the University of Colorado campus. The $100,000 Cox is asking for on Kickstarter will be used for "space suits, spaceships, models and 35mm stock and processing." The film will be shot in black and white, and though some CGI will be used for laser blasts and the like, Cox said he plans to keep most of the film's technology "rooted in the mid-1960s," to give it a classic sci-fi feel.

If all goes according to plan, Cox hopes to have Bill, the Galactic Hero finished by December 2014. First, though, he needs the money. So, have a look at the introduction video below, and if you're interested in ponying up some cash to get this flick made, head over to the Kickstarter page. If you give enough, you'll even get an executive producer credit.

 (Via Kickstarter)