Maine company will build you a real Hobbit house for $5K to $15K

It may not come with a wizard pal, a band of dwarves or the legendary Baggins pantry, but you can now grace your backyard with your very own Hobbit hole -- for a price.

Maine-based company Wooden Wonders has launched a line of several different Hobbit-themed wooden buildings, ranging in size from a 16-foot-wide "cottage" model to a smaller shed or a chicken coop model (you know, so you can raise Shire chickens). They don't look exactly like the ones Peter Jackson and crew designed for the films, but they do feature beautiful woodcraft and include pretty little round  doors. For an extra fee, Wooden Wonders will even partially embed them in the ground for you. And they're not just pretty on the outside. Take a look:

But living in this kind of Middle-earth-themed luxury does come at a price. The biggest models of Wooden Wonders' Hobbit cottage start at around $15,000, not including additional features, like insulation, that would allow you to actually be comfortable in the building all year long. If you're in the market for something smaller, you can get a small utility building for less than $4,000, so your lawnmower and other lawn tools can live like a Baggins.

It's not exactly the spacious confines of Bag End, but if you've got a little money to spend on a man cave or a workshop or just a quiet place to sit and read, this might be your ticket. Head on over to Wooden Wonders' website for even more photos of pretty Hobbit holes.

(Wooden Wonders via Offbeat Home)

 

Related Stories

Extended edition of The Hobbit trilogy coming to theaters, because originals not long enough Trent Moore

If you’ve been waiting for a butt-numbingly long chance to catch the extended versions of all three Hobbit films on the big screen, you’re in luck. 

McKellen's favorite Hobbit scene didn't even make it in the movie Trent Moore

After expanding The Hobbit from two films to a full trilogy, you'd think there wouldn't be much left for Peter Jackson to cut out for extended versions. Turns out he still shot too much, and a scene left on the cutting room floor was among Sir Ian McKellen's (Gandalf) favorites from the first installment. So what was it?