Should author be left out of Ender's Game PR? Some execs think so

The marketing is due to begin on that Ender's Game movie very soon, but should Orson Scott Card be left out of it?

Card is a huge name in the sci-fi world. Ender's Game is a seminal series that helps define sci-fi as a genre. Card, however, is also known for having a rather vocal and divisive attitude when it comes to the definition of marriage and homosexuality in general. He is on the board of the National Organization for Marriage, a group that wants to ensure that marriage is defined solely as between one man and one woman, and has openly said, "Marriage has only one definition, and any government that attempts to change it is my mortal enemy. I will act to destroy that government and bring it down."

But we've known this for a while, so why is it suddenly news again? Well, recently DC Comics brought Card on to pen a Superman story. The fan response was so immediate and so negative that the calls for a boycott of both the story and DC in general caught the attention of Hollywood executives.

Summit Entertainment have already moved their film adaptation of Ender's Game from March to November, so clearly they believe it can be a big money-maker during the holiday season. What they may be worried about, though, is the impact Card could have on that box-office success.

One studio exec has been reported as saying, "I don't think you take him to any fanboy event," while another went so far as to say, "Keep him out of the limelight as much as possible." The big question here is less of integrity and more about audience. In a perfect world, Card would be out on the forefront of marketing, stumping for the film (if he likes it, of course) and leaving his personal politics out of it. Even so, the risk is that many people will boycott the film if they see Card at all. Then again, wouldn't those same people boycott it anyway? Or is there really such a thing as out of sight, out of mind?

(via The Hollywood Reporter)