Looks like Sin City and The Mist are both being turned into TV series

The box office has always been a popular talent pool when it comes to picking potential TV properties — and it sounds like two more fan favorites will soon be heading to the small screen.

In a wide-ranging interview with The New York Times, veteran film producer Harvey Weinstein revealed he is developing TV projects based on the Sin City franchise, as well as Stephen King’s novella (and the 2007 film adaptation) The Mist

Details are sketchy at the moment, but we do know that Weinstein is eyeing a 10-episode “event series” concept for The Mist, with the film’s director Frank Darabont (aka the guy who also helped created AMC’s The Walking Dead) returning in some capacity. The concept is perfect for a mini series, and with Darabont involved, this could be a super-creepy hit, a la The Walking Dead.

But if that turns out to be the case, here's hoping Darabont might actually be able to stick around this time.

Weinstein is also ratcheting up development on a Sin City series, which would launch shortly after the upcoming film sequel Sin City: A Dame to Die For in late 2014. He is also eyeing comic creator Frank Miller and film director Robert Rodriguez to helm the adaptation, which should be a relief for fans.

It’ll be interesting to see if they’re able to find a way to translate the film’s trademark visuals into a weekly series, plus match all the R-rated insanity that made Sin City so enjoyable in the first place. If anything, it’d almost have to land at an edgy cable network to have a chance.

So, why the sudden push to make use of these properties? Weinstein said he believes the cross-pollination is a way to “add stability” to his company, by developing the TV side to a point where it is “as powerful as the theatrical division.”

Though we love the films, fans already know that a cool movie does not automatically translate into a good/successful TV show. For every critical hit like Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles (which was canceled anyway due to low ratings) and Buffy The Vampire Slayer, there are more than enough duds like Mortal Kombat: Konquest and Blade: The Series out there to serve as cautionary tales.

What do you think? Could these two work on the small screen?


(Via /Film)

More from around the web