Ridley Scott says going into space for real is "@#$!-ing absurd"

For someone who has created some of the most epic sci-fi worlds in modern history, Ridley Scott (Alien, Blade Runner, Prometheus) is apparently not a huge fan of real-life space travel. In fact, he thinks it's "@#$!-ing absurd."

In a Q&A with Esquire, the topic of space tourism came up, and—though it's one of his favorite film mediums—Scott made it known very quickly that he has no interest in actually visiting space.

Esquire: We're getting closer to space tourism becoming a reality. Have you bought a ticket yet on the Virgin Galactic?

Ridley Scott: Good God no. No, no. Not a chance.

Esquire: You have no interest in being an astronaut?

Ridley Scott: Nothing could interest me less. I'd much rather have a martini and go to a nice restaurant.

Esquire: You could do a lot more than that with the money. Tickets on the Virgin Galactic are $200,000.

Ridley Scott: Really? That's [@#$!]-ing absurd. I'm just not their target audience for this. The idea of flying in general does not appeal to me. I can barely understand why people want to fly at all, other than that it's occasionally necessary.

Scott then goes on to joke about how his own qualms with space travel have actually informed the way he portrays it on-screen, with terrible things often waiting for us when we journey outside our corner of the universe.
Esquire: In Alien and now Prometheus, you make space travel seem like a nightmare. If your movies are to be believed, it involves long stretches of boredom and sadness, punctuated with moments of extreme violence and terror. Do you think that's what it's really like?

Ridley Scott: Totally. [Laughs] You're actually a sentimentalist. If you're doing any serious space travel, going any respectable distance, you have to be put into a coma for the journey.

Sound off: Do you agree with Scott, or are you looking forward to the day when you can take a nickel tour of the solar system?

(Via Esquire)

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