David Tennant on typecasting and how Doctor Who stole his privacy

For most actors, the fear of being typecast in a certain role is very real. After inhabiting a popular and beloved character for a number of years, some people will always see said actor as that particular character and very little else. But it appears that the pesky typecast curse has eluded David Tennant, one of the most popular Who Doctors of all time.

In an interview with Radio Times, Tennant spoke about his tenure as the Tenth Doctor—who he played from 2005 to 2010—and how he feels the role has (thankfully for him) not typecast him:

"I'm very glad it happened. Mercifully, I haven't been typecast and it opened more doors than it closed. I was never bored, but I wanted to make sure I left before it became a job. It's still thriving and Matt Smith is brilliant in the part."

One of those doors would be, as you guys will recall, the role of Criss Angel-like illusionist and reluctant vampire hunter Peter Vincent in last year's Fright Night remake, a role Tennant completely made his own. (He was actually one of the best things about that remake, if you ask us.)

Of course, when you become as popular as Tennant did with his manic interpretation of the Tenth Doctor, one's privacy completely goes out the proverbial window:

"Of course I lost a certain amount of right to privacy, which is not what I'd choose, but I accept. No one can teach you what it's like to be observed in public. I remember, before I was that person, watching well-known people walk into a room—you imbue them with inner confidence and a slightly royal presence. Yet when it's you, it's terrifying. The world's perception of you has changed while you remain the same.

"You understand what you're getting into by being on TV. I'm not that naive. But there's a sense everyone in the public eye has to have moral purity. I don't see why, because you're in a TV programme, you have to be perfect."

What do you think? Do you guys agree with David Tennant?

(Via Radio Times)

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