So how much did Spidey musical's director just win in her lawsuit?

Though all the injuries and delays finally gave way to a Broadway smash, a lingering lawsuit from the former Spider-Man: Turn off the Dark director has hung over the play like a gooey ball of webbing—but not anymore.

Julie Taymor, who was axed as the show's director in March 2011, has settled a lawsuit against the musical's producers that will pay her a cool $10,000 for every week the show runs. And judging by the frequent sellout crowds, that could be a while.

Taymor collaborated with U2's Bono and the Edge early in development, but was let go amid a flurry of delays and negative press that nearly derailed the $75 million production.

The show is earning approximately $1 million per week now, and if the show stays open for at least two years—which is certainly possible, as it just keeps doing better—Taymor could easily earn a million or more herself before it's all said and done.

The producers of the show, Michael Cohl and Jeremiah J. Harris, say they're happy to have the suit settled and behind them.

"We are very happy to have reached an amicable compromise with the SDC that will allow us all to move on," the pair said in a joint statement reported by The New York Times. "Now we can focus our energies on providing an amazing entertainment experience for our audiences, who have come to see the show in record numbers and made it a tremendous hit."

(via The New York Times).

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