10 Emmy-worthy sci-fi performances we're hoping earn a nomination

We're still a few weeks away from seeing who got nominated for an Emmy, and until the official announcement, we plan on living in hope that some of these stellar sci-fi performances of the past year manage to make the cut.

It's a cutthroat business getting an Emmy nomination, and it tends to be even tougher for performers from sci-fi series. But that doesn't mean there aren't tons of worthy competitors out there.

So here are 10 sci-fi actors and actresses that definitely deserve to be included come July 19.


Jason Isaacs, NBC's Awake

The show may have mostly been ignored by the viewing public, but this short-lived series about a man living two lives was one of the highest concepts we've seen in years—and star Jason Isaacs knocked it out of the park as a father and husband dealing with the loss of his son and wife in different realities.


Jon Bernthal, AMC's The Walking Dead

Bernthal's Shane was one of the most hated characters in the show's second season, but he was also one of the craziest, most tragic and most nuanced characters on television. His arc kept season two moving, and the epic conclusion was positively insane.


Peter Dinklage, HBO's Game of Thrones

Dinklage's portrayal of Tyrion Lannister is one of the highlights of this hit fantasy series, and we wouldn't be too surprise if he followed up his Emmy win last year with another nomination in 2012.


Benedict Cumberbatch, PBS (BBC)'s Sherlock

Cumberbatch is one of the greatest actors on television today, and with a few major films coming down the pike, the actor is poised to be a much bigger name very soon. But it's his fantastic turn in Steven Moffat's hit Sherlock series that really put him on the map.


John Noble, Fox's Fringe

Everybody's favorite mad scientist, Dr. Walter Bishop, is the glue that holds this series together, and Noble was able to take the character through several transformations this past season due to the shifting timelines.


Jessica Lange, FX's American Horror Story

Jessica Lange was, hands down, the best thing about the first season of FX's creepily awesome horror series—and she was just a supporting actress. Lange is definitely worthy of a nomination, and a win, for her unforgettable turn as the cold-blooded Constance.


Anna Torv, Fox's Fringe

Torv is asked to do a lot of things as agent Olivia Dunham, and her ability to ground even the most fantastical sci-fi plot point in reality makes her more than worthy of a nomination. After everything her character went through in the latest season, plus her turn playing alt-reality versions of herself, Torv has definitely earned some respect.


Lena Headey, HBO's Game of Thrones

Her role in this fantasy drama is definitely different than her awesome take on Sarah Connor in Fox's short-lived Terminator series, but her character grew into one of the most exciting in the series during the latest season.


Karen Gillan, BBC America's Doctor Who

Amy Pond has been a highlight of Steven Moffat's run on this classic British sci-fi series, and she has definitely shown her strength as an actress tackling some of last season's storylines dealing with the theft of her daughter.


Anna Paquin, HBO's True Blood

Despite its age, the hit vamp soap remains a big draw at HBO, and Anna Paquin is still the one that ties it all together.


So who would get YOUR vote?

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