Always truthful, forthright Loki talks Thor 2 and The Avengers

There had been rumors that Thor 2's new director—Kenneth Branagh is not coming back in the director's chair, as you know—would be a Game of Thrones director by the name of Brian Kirk. But it's still not set in stone, according to Tom Hiddleston, who plays the trickster god himself, Loki.

Speaking to MTV, Hiddleston revealed that Brian Kirk's seat in the director's chair may not be as warm as some would have thought. About the rumors, he said:

"I don't know that that's actually confirmed. That's not me being coy. I spoke to Kevin Feige last week on [The Avengers] set and he said, 'Oh no, we haven't got anyone yet. We're thinking about people.'"

Feige is an executive producer at Marvel Studios who's been behind almost every Marvel superhero film in the last decade, starting with X-Men back in 2000.

"I think [Kirk's] name is definitely in the hat,'' Hiddleston added. ''But I don't think anything is solid."

If Kirk is chosen to helm Thor 2 (the story of which will pick up directly from The Avengers), it would be the TV director's first major, effects-driven gig for the big screen. He's previously helmed the indie feature Middletown; three episodes of HBO's Game of Thrones, one for Boardwalk Empire and one for Dexter; and a bunch of other stuff.

This reminds us of David Yates, who also got his big break on a splashy big-budget film by directing Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (quite successfully, we might add, since he also directed the subsequent Potter installments) after working mostly for TV.

Hiddleston also talked about how different Loki will be in The Avengers from how he was in Thor:

"In The Avengers he's really dark and kind of sociopathic, or maybe even psychopathic is the word, in a deluded way. Obviously I haven't let go of the spiritual damage at the heart of him, it still comes from that lost place, but he's just incredibly nasty. I think that probably in Thor 2 his previous actions will, he'll have to take responsibility for what he's done."

And does he think Loki can be redeemed in the end?

"The great thing about Loki is there is potential in him for greatness and awfulness, for great heroism and great villainy. There are still, even within The Avengers, there are moments where you see within Loki a glimmer of hope and that possibility of redemption."

What do you think?

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