Big-screen Buffy remake going ahead—WITHOUT Joss Whedon

That big-screen Buffy the Vampire Slayer we've been hoping for is FINALLY moving forward, but it turns out it'll be without Sarah Michelle Gellar—and without Buffy mastermind Joss Whedon.

Whit Anderson (who wrote the mildly funny Jim Carrey vehicle Yes Man) is the woman currently writing the script for Warner Brothers' proposed reboot to the popular series that ran for seven seasons on The CW (formerly The WB).

In an interview with Hero Complex, Anderson revealed that she is "fighting through" the script, and Charles Roven, one of the producers of Batman Begins, who's apparently on board this Buffy remake (it was his company, Atlas Entertainment, who signed her on after he "saw something special in Anderson's tone and story"), said about this new take on Buffy:

Generally, I wouldn't have said 'Let's revive this,' but Whit's take is pretty compelling and a lot of fun, and it's interesting to see all of this re-imagined. This is a completely new reboot. Tone is extremely important and you want the audience to realize what is at stake and the peril is real, but at the same time what's going on should be fun and inviting and keep everyone engaged. It needs to be relevant to today, too, and that is what Whit has found a way to do.
He also added that:
There is an active fan base eagerly awaiting this character's return.... While this is not your high-school Buffy, she'll be just as witty, tough and sexy as we all remember her to be.

So no high-school Buffy? We're wondering what THAT will really mean, since Buffy's almost always been about the metaphors of high school, and they plan to throw out the window as part of the reboot.

There's also no director anounced for the movie yet, but Roven is apparently hopeful to see this new version of Buffy hit the screens in 2012, or even in 2011.

At least Whit Anderson is aware that without Joss Whedon it'll definitely be an uphill battle to bring in fans of the original series, many of whom may feel that this is something that shouldn't go ahead without Whedon or even, to a certain limit, Sarah Michelle Gellar. But she's hopeful that the fans will come, pointing to the success of Christopher Nolan's revival of Batman as the ultimate example of how something can be revamped for a new audience with a completely new and fresh vision.

What do you think? Do you want a Buffy reboot? But most importantly, do you think there whould be a Buffy reboot WITHOUT Joss Whedon?

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