A fantasy film for kids and adults that's just dumb enough

Jonathan Swift's 1726 novel Gulliver's Travels was a social satire in the form of a fantasy story about a visit to lands of miniature people and giants, a flying island and a place where horses rule primitive humans.

The 2010 movie based on Swift's story stars Jack Black as a travel writer who visits these lands after getting lost in the Bermuda Triangle, and while the modern update might have English professors reeling, the film's co-star, Emily Blunt, says it's still a smart comedy.

"It's not fart jokes," Blunt said in a group interview Friday in Los Angeles, where she was promoting The Young Victoria. "There's not a fart joke in sight. Don't worry. It's very smart and witty."

Nicholas Stoller (Undeclared, Yes Man) and Joe Stillman (Shrek, Shrek 2, Planet 51) wrote the remake. Rob Letterman (Shark Tale, Monsters vs. Aliens) directs. Blunt says their Gulliver is aimed at kids but is still smart enough for their parents. "It's great for kids and adults," she said. "There are the in-jokes for adults."

Blunt plays the Princess of Lilliput, where the people are one-12th the size of Gulliver (Black). "I play a princess who's not very bright," she said. "I have a really good time with that."

Still, die-hard Swift fans and scholars may never be happy with a remake. "Listen, people who are very loyal to the book, I'm sure, will have their qualms about the fact that we've made this a kind of romping comedy," Blunt said. "It's still very funny. It's very funny. I loved that script. It's great."

After playing Queen Victoria in The Young Victoria and a Victorian damsel in The Wolfman, Blunt joked that she just can't avoid corsets. "Another corset," she groaned. "Literally, I don't know what I'm doing. I'm obviously only taking on roles where people have to bow to me. That's literally all I'm doing right now."

Gulliver's Travels opens Dec. 22, 2010.

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