Review: Zoe Bell beats the crap out of everybody in Angel of Death

Eve (Bell) is nobody's nomination for nice lady.

A contract killer by trade, working for the mob, she has little time or inclination for nonsense like friendship and romantic relationships. Oh, sure, she'll hop into bed with co-workers, but she's only irritated by post-coital chitchat of the sort that implies anybody involved gives a damn about anybody else. It's just her way of taking the edge off before tomorrow's kill, which stands no chance of disturbing her conscience no matter how piteously the victim begs for his life.

And then one contract goes disastrously wrong. Eve takes out somebody who shouldn't have been in the line of fire. And she stumbles away from the carnage with something unexpected on her mind—specifically, a knife buried hilt-deep in her skull.

In the aftermath, she finds herself haunted by a figure that might be the first manifestation of Eve's previously nonexistent conscience ... and might be a visitor from beyond the grave.

The net series Angel of Death, written by Ed Brubaker (best known for Daredevil, Criminal and other hard-boiled comics) and starring stuntwoman/ actress Zoe Bell (best known to most people as the toughest of the four ladies who catch up with the serial killer in Quentin Tarantino's Death Proof), is currently running in seven- to 10-minute installments on Crackle.Com. It's not deep, nor would you expect it to be when just about each of the 10 daily installments (the entirety of what will be a feature) works in a scene of Bell kicking ass. But it has a ferocious, bone-breaking, bullet-spraying momentum, and there are few action-movie pleasures as down and dirty as watching Bell beat the crap out of everybody who even looks at her funny. And her theme music, which opens and closes every installment and plays every time she's punching somebody in close quarters, is downright addictive.

Look for genre icons Ted Raimi and Doug Jones as fellow members of the mob and one-time Xena Lucy Lawless, whom Bell used to double for, as a sympathetic ex-hooker.

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