Does Star Trek need more rock 'n' roll? The writers thought so

Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman, co-writers of J.J. Abrams' upcoming Star Trek reboot movie, told SciFiNow Magazine that they felt the need to inject a little "rock and roll" to energize the beloved franchise, according to a report on TrekMovie.com.

"We figured the missing ingredient for this one was it needed a little rock and roll," Kurtzman told the magazine. "And if we succeeded in doing that, I think it will meet the summer expectations. Star Trek was essentially a submarine naval battle, except in space. Star Wars was flying down the trench of the Death Star at the speed of mach 70,000 to shoot a little bullet into a [hole]. The experience as a viewer you have is different: There's a speed, I think, associated with that experience. To my mind, there was no reason they had to be mutually exclusive. Obviously you have to be very true to spirit of what Star Trek is, and you cannot violate canon, but that doesn't mean you can't have some of that as well."

This seems to confirm SCI FI Wire's impression of early Star Trek footage, which screened for select press in November and which felt as much like Star Wars as old-school Trek.

Kurtzman also talked about how the new story was structured in such a way as to allow Leonard Nimoy to appear as Spock in something more than a cameo performance. "He is also there because he wants to be there, and that actually was the highest compliment for all of us and in many ways was our compass," Kurtzman said. "Because he had said he absolutely would not do it again, and it's not like he needed the money. If he's going to do it, it's because he genuinely believes in it and actually feels that it is going in the right direction. For us that was the barometer."

The full interview can be seen in SciFiNow issue 22, available as a backorder at Imagineshop.co.uk. Star Trek opens May 8.

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